Wish I could be there for this

Wish I could be there for this

kissing is great.

nomobsessions:

thecakebar:

Smores + Oreos = Smoreos

what the holy ever living fuck

vegan dandies for the marshmallows, this caramel sauce recipe, ghirardelli’s semi-sweet chocolate (yup they’re vegan) chips oooor your fav. brand of vegan chocolate chips and vegan butter o’course. 

(Source: schmookens)

See what your followers think of you.

BLACK = I would date you.
GREEN = I think you’re cute.
BLUE = You are my tumblr crush.
GREY = I wish you would notice me.
PURPLE = I don’t talk to you but I really love your blog.
TEAL = We have a lot in common.
YELLOW = FUCK ME.
ORANGE = I don’t like your blog.
BROWN = I don’t like you.
PINK = I think you are unattractive.
RED = I love you with a burning passion.
WHITE = MARRY ME.

mitchclem:

Man, I haven’t had a project go over this well in a long time! People are really loving this first issue! Scoop one up before it’s super popular and played-out and you’re just some weak-ass Johnny-come-lately!

[BUY ONLINE]

steveboobscemi:

davidyanik:

Toby Foster - Speech Patterns

Toby u break my heart every time. I luv u still u genius

(Source: datdynamitekyle)

sciencesoup:

Ginkgo Trees Stand Test of Time
“Living fossil” is an informal term used by biologists to describe species that lack living relatives.  While you might not personally think being called a fossil is a compliment, these organisms are actually quite impressive survivors.  The Ginkgo biloba tree, for example, is strange and unique amongst contemporary plants but incredibly similar to fossils dating back to the Permian, almost 270 million years! This means that even though every single other lineage of the Ginkgo’s relatives changed and adapted beyond recognition or died out, there are still Ginkgo trees growing today that would be indistinguishable from trees from hundreds of millions of years ago. If that fails to impress you, consider this: in Hiroshima, Japan there are still a handful of Ginkgo trees that survived the dropping of the atom bomb in 1945 living to the present day! If these hardy trees can withstand a disturbance of an A-bomb’s magnitude, it is no wonder they have managed to remain viable when so many other ancient plants could not.
Guest post written by Reggie Henke

sciencesoup:

Ginkgo Trees Stand Test of Time

“Living fossil” is an informal term used by biologists to describe species that lack living relatives.  While you might not personally think being called a fossil is a compliment, these organisms are actually quite impressive survivors.  The Ginkgo biloba tree, for example, is strange and unique amongst contemporary plants but incredibly similar to fossils dating back to the Permian, almost 270 million years! This means that even though every single other lineage of the Ginkgo’s relatives changed and adapted beyond recognition or died out, there are still Ginkgo trees growing today that would be indistinguishable from trees from hundreds of millions of years ago. If that fails to impress you, consider this: in Hiroshima, Japan there are still a handful of Ginkgo trees that survived the dropping of the atom bomb in 1945 living to the present day! If these hardy trees can withstand a disturbance of an A-bomb’s magnitude, it is no wonder they have managed to remain viable when so many other ancient plants could not.

Guest post written by Reggie Henke

(Source: aanniimmee)